How to report an ad?

If you've found an ad on Rays Market that you think is abusive, fake or fraudulent, our community relies on great people like you letting us know by reporting the ad. To do this, simply go to the ad and click the "Mark as..." button and tell us what's wrong with the advert.

We'll open up and investigation and take any necessary action. You don't have to do anything else! If you don't hear back from us, don't worry
- we will be doing everything we can behind the scenes.

If you would like to report something not covered by these links please use the "offensive or spam" link.

If you are if the ad complies with our guidelines, please read our terms of use and posting rules.

What do the options mean?

Offensive
The advert content is abusive in some way or violates our terms of use.

Misclassified
There's nothing wrong with the ad but it's in the wrong category (E.g. a "For sale" ad in the "Classes" section)

Duplicate
The advert has been posted multiple times. If possible please report each instance of the ad.

Scam
You suspect the advert is part of a scam.

If you made contact via email please note that not all users check their email every day so it may take a few days for you to get a response.

Other recommendations

BUYER PROTECTION

The vast majority of all classified transactions are genuine, especially with www.Rays-Market.com where many of the transactions take place face-to-face. However, occasionally our readers might be targeted by scams. When you buy anything online, be smart. Make sure you check… price comparison websites and different search engines to get the best deal, the name and full address of the seller and the Terms and Conditions.

These scams can be avoided if you know what to look out for. Please read the below to get a better understanding of the risks and the ways to protect yourself.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Meeting the buyer
Most private advertisers sell their goods from home. For personal ease and safety, always ensure that there is a friend with you before you allow someone into your home.

Meeting the seller
We would always recommend meeting sellers at their home address where the item for sale is situated. This is particularly useful when buying a larger more expensive item e.g. a car. Also take the opportunity if applicable to see the item working.

Valuable items
When selling valuable items – such as a car – you should ask for a personal cheque to be cleared before you part with your goods, and offer a receipt and invoice as proof of purchase.

Accepting money
For items that are worth only a few pounds, it‘s easier and more convenient to pay in cash. To be safe, when you go to visit the person selling the item you are interested in, don‘t take more money than you are planning on spending.

Rays Market recommends that buyers NEVER send goods before receiving money.
I‘ve sent the advertiser my money but he has not sent the goods.
Unfortunately, we are unable to interfere in the private transactions between a buyer and a seller.
The advertiser wants me to send cash up front – what should I do?
Don‘t do it. Rays Market recommends that buyers NEVER send cash or cheques through the post, or place money directly into a seller‘s bank account, in advance of receiving goods.

Buyer beware!
Once you have bought an item from a private seller, you have no legal comeback if it turns out to be faulty. Therefore, check the goods thoroughly before handing over the money. If the seller still has the receipts, or a warranty, so much the better.

Keep records
If travel is involved in the transaction, always remember to write down the contact details of the people you are visiting, or the people who are visiting you. If, for whatever reason, you are unable to make the appointment, notify them in advance. If you are travelling to view or deliver an item contact the other party first to check they will be available.

Manufacturer’s safety: pushchair
Some pushchair manufacturers provide free hinge covers as an added safety feature on models purchased before 2009. Please see manufacturers‘ websites for details.

HOW TO SPOT SCAM ADS & SCAM RESPONSES

Look out for:

• Adverts that contain very poor grammar / spelling errors.

• Anyone requesting money in advance of you receiving the goods or viewing/ moving in to a property.

• Anyone who says they are in a different town / area of the country than the postcode entered on the advert.

• Anyone offering expensive items for free, or at a discounted rate, on the condition that you pay large sums of money to cover travel, postage or courier costs.

• Anyone offering to buy your item for a higher cost than you are advertising it at to include shipping to them

• Anyone asking you to remove your item. Anyone offering something that seems too good to be true. Anyone who wants payment via MoneyGram or Western Union

• Anyone who only corresponds by email and is unavailable by phone.

Remember: if you spot a scam advert or become a victim of a scam, please report it.

If you think you have spotted a scam advert on our website, you can alert our Customer Services. Please be aware that the investigation process may take over 24 hours.

KNOWN SCAMS TARGETING SELLERS

Overpayment Scam

Be wary of:
Anyone ‘accidentally‘ paying more than the item is worth, either by cheque or bankers draft.
If you are contacted by someone who offers to buy an item from you, and then you receive a cheque or banker‘s draft for more than the item is worth, you may be being targeted by an Overpayment scam. Victims are requested to cash the more expensive cheque or bankers draft and then send the bought item along with the extra money to the buyer. The original cheque duly bounces and victims lose the item and their money. If you receive a cheque/bankers draft with an overpayment please do not cash it, instead hand it in to the police immediately.

Western Unions or Moneygram scams

Be wary of:
Anyone asking to complete the transaction using either Western Union or MoneyGram. These payment systems are not designed to be used by strangers, rather they are for exchanging money between people who know each other. The most common example of scams using either of these payment methods involve the scammer asking the victim to prove they have the necessary funds to complete the transaction by paying money to a friend or relative using one of these services and then showing them the receipt (as proof that the funds are available). All the scammer needs is the tracking number from the receipt to pose as the victim‘s friend or relative and claim the money.

HOW TO REPORT A SCAM

If you believe you are being targeted by a scam then please email Rays Market Customer Services. You should also contact both the Police and Consumer. Rays Market is unable to contact police on your behalf, so you will need to contact them directly.

Contacting the Police

Before you go to the police, you should make 100% sure that this is an incidence of fraud by ensuring that you are not simply dealing with a seller or buyer who is either slow at sending an item / money or poor at keeping in contact. We always encourage our customers to try to resolve the issue with the seller or buyer directly before involving the police.

Is it a crime or a civil dispute?

Upon reporting your case to the police, they will decide if it should be investigated as a crime of if the incident is a civil dispute which should be settled in the county (small claims) court. In order for you to recover your losses through the small claims court you will need the name and address of the other party. A police officer will be able to guide you through this process. For more information please refer to justice government of your country:

Making a police report

To report a crime to the police you can either go to your local police station, call the local police operator on a non-emergency number or some forces have an online crime reporting system. To find more information on your local police force and how to contact them, please refer to justice govt of your country.

What evidence do I need?

Rays Market cannot release personal details of advertisers to the general public due to the Data Protection Act. The Police will provide us with the necessary documentation to release this information directly to them.